New servers tend to freak out about getting a process server license. But for most of us, a license isn’t even required. Take my home state, Colorado, for example: Any individual over the age of 18 can work as a process server. It’s as simple as printing up some business cards and scoring your first client (okay, maybe not that simple).

To find the requirements for your state, search for the “rules of civil procedure” on your state’s judicial branch website. Find the section that covers service of process and print it out. This is your rule book.

For a quicker look at your state’s process server license requirements, check out the become a process server page. But keep in mind, your state’s judicial branch is always the most up-to-date source for information.

Don’t get discouraged if your state regulates process servers. The requirements are usually simple and can be completed in a few weeks. The upside is that it limits the competition. Servers in these states can often charge higher fees. And if you’re new to the business, having a process server license can provide the credibility you need to attract good clients.

In the meantime, don’t delay getting your business started. Research the laws in your state, survey the average rates in your local market, register your business, and get a website up and running. Do everything you can to be ready when your license is finally approved.

Also, not all states that regulate process servers issue a license. California requires registration (with a background check but no educational or testing standard) and Florida requires appointment by the county as a special process server (you’ll have to pass a test administered by the sheriff’s office and take an oath).

Now if you’re lucky enough to live in a state like Colorado, with no process server license requirements, congratulations, there’s nothing to stop you but yourself.