Can a Process Server Wear a Badge?

About half the messages I get are from people asking, “Can a process server wear a badge?”

And the answer is simple. In most cases, yes, a process server can wear a badge.

As long as you’re not impersonating a law enforcement officer, and there’s no local law restricting the use of badges, process servers can and often do wear badges.

In fact, I have a personalized badge that I’ve worn while making serves.

But it’s important to consider the context.

Think about it like this:

Imagine you’re a defendant trying to avoid service. If you see someone wearing a badge walking up to the front door, would you answer it?

Of course not.

And sometimes process servers who insist on wearing a badge make things a lot harder for themselves.

It’s much easier to approach the defendant without a badge, authority demeanor, or any of the usual telltale signs of law enforcement.

That’s why I’m most successful making serves in jeans and a t-shirt. Sometimes I even wear shorts. But I always avoid setting off those red flags.

In the wrong neighborhood a process server wearing a badge can bring a lot of unwanted and negative attention, or the neighbors could even alert the defendant of your approach.

When should a process server wear a badge?

That said, there are certainly times when wearing a badge can make things easier, like when serving process in a corporate or government office building. And in the event that a situation escalates and law enforcement respond to the scene, a badge can help identify your position.

I wear mine under my shirt on a chain with a leather badge holder. It’s ready when I need it, hidden when I don’t.

If you’re looking to get a custom process server badge, I recommend ordering from these folks. I’m not a paid endorser, just a satisfied customer.

Besides, I always go with small businesses, and in this case, they happen to be owned by firefighters.